Field marshal haig hero or butcher

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Field marshal haig hero or butcher

In the new Liberal Government DecemberRichard HaldaneSecretary of State for Warimplemented the Esher recommendations accepted in principle by the outgoing Conservative government. Haig was intolerant of what he regarded as old-fashioned opinion and not good at negotiating with strangers.

Haig had wanted a reserve ofmen, but Haldane settled for a more realisticAs an intimate of Haldane Haig was able to ensure high priority for cavalry, less for artillery, contrary to the advice of Lord Roberts now retired as Commander-in-Chief whose views were no longer very welcome because his campaign for conscription had made life hard for Haldane.

He supervised publication of "Field Service Regulations", which was later very useful in expanding the BEF in WW1, although it still stressed the importance of cavalry charging with sword and lance as well as fighting dismounted.

Haig, who had been knighted for his work at the War Office, was promoted to lieutenant-general in November At dinner afterwards Haig abandoned his prepared text, and although he wrote that his remarks were "well received" Charteris recorded that they were "unintelligible and unbearably dull" and that the visiting dignitaries fell asleep.

In a letter to Haldane 4 AugustHaig predicted that the war would last for months if not years; Haig wanted Haldane to return to the War Office Asquith had been holding the job since the resignation of Seeley during the Curragh Affair — it was given to Kitchener and delay sending the BEF to France until the Territorial Army had been mobilised and incorporated.

There were no other contingency plans — Haig and Kitchener proposed that the BEF would be better positioned to counter-attack in Amiens. Sir John French suggested landing at Antwerpwhich was vetoed by Winston Churchill as the Royal Navy could not guarantee safe passage.

A critical biographer writes that Haig was "more clear-sighted than many of his colleagues". However Haig also rewrote his diary from this period, possibly to show himself in a better light and French in a poor one.

The original manuscript diary for early August does not survive but there is no positive evidence that it was destroyed; and it has been pointed out that it is just as likely that the extant typed version was prepared from dictation or notes now lost.

Haig predicted that the war would last several years and that an army of a million men, trained by officers and NCOs withdrawn from the BEF, would be needed.

He later claimed that these doubts had gone back to the Boer War but there appears to have been an element of later embellishment about this; Haig who had criticised Kitchener, Roberts and others had in fact praised French during the Boer War and had welcomed his appointment as CIGS in Monro commanding 2nd DivisionBrigadier-General J.

Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig - Wikipedia

Haig crossed over to Le Havre. Haig was irritated by Sir John French influenced by Henry Wilson into putting his faith in a French thrust up from the Ardennes who was only concerned with the three German corps in front of the BEF at Mons and who ignored intelligence reports of German forces streaming westwards from Brussels, threatening an encirclement from the British left.

The two corps were supposed to meet at Le Cateau but I Corps under Haig were stopped at Landreciesleaving a large gap between the two corps. Haig was irritated by the high-handed behaviour of the French, seizing roads which they had promised for British use and refusing to promise to cover the British right flank.

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He complained privately of French unreliability and lack of fighting competence, a complaint which he would keep up for the next four years.

He wrote to his wife that he wished the British were operating independently from Antwerp, a proposal which he had rejected as "reckless", when Sir John French had made it at the War Council on 4 August. The battle to defend Paris began on 5 September and became known as the first Battle of the Marne.

Haig had wanted to rest his corps but was happy to resume the offensive when ordered. He drove on his subordinates, including Ivor Maxse, when he thought them lacking in "fighting spirit". I Corps marched headlong into a thrust westward by fresh German forces and the result was the First Battle of Ypres.

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German forces, equipped with heavy guns a large number for this early stage in the waroutnumbered I Corps by two to one and came close to success. Haig was also influenced by the fact that the Germans had called off their offensive when they were on the verge of success, and he drew the lesson that attacks needed to be kept up so long as there was any chance of success.

Haig thought that Wilson, besides being too pro-French, had "no military knowledge" and recommended Quarter-Master General "Wully" Robertson for the vacancy. This was also the view of Lord Kitchener, so Robertson received the promotion. Shortage of shells meant that only a thirty-five-minute bombardment was possible but the small front of the attack gave it the concentration to succeed.

Casualties were around 12, on each side. This may have made Rawlinson reluctant to stand up to Haig thereafter. It was believed on the British side that the lessons of Neuve Chapelle had been learned—reserves were ready to exploit and mortars were ready to support attackers who had advanced beyond artillery cover ——and that this time success would be complete not partial.

The attack was less successful than Neuve Chapelle as the forty-minute bombardment only field guns and heavy guns was over a wider front and against stronger defences; Haig was still focussed on winning a decisive victory by capturing key ground, rather than amassing firepower to inflict maximum damage on the Germans.

Haig did not approve of the Northcliffe press attacks on Kitchener, whom he thought a powerful military voice against the folly of civilians like Churchill despite the fact the Kitchener had played a role in planning the Gallipoli expedition and was an opponent of the strong General Staff which Haig wanted to see.

Fictional examples used ironically

French also communicated with Conservative leaders and to David Lloyd George who now became Minister of Munitions in the new coalition government. Battle of Loos The war was not going well — besides the failure at Cape Helles landing 25 AprilBulgaria had joined the Central Powers Serbia was soon overrun and Italian attacks on the Isonzo had made negligible progress.

Allied attacks in the west were needed to take pressure off the Russians, who were being flung out of Poland after the Fall of Warsaw, 5 August.

The original plan was to attack in July.

Field marshal haig hero or butcher

French later did the same and agreed. French and Haig would have preferred to renew the attack at Aubers Ridge.

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The Battle of the Somme (French: Bataille de la Somme; German: Schlacht an der Somme), also known as the Somme Offensive, was a battle of the First World War fought by the armies of the British Empire and French Empire against the German timberdesignmag.com took place between 1 July and 18 November on both sides of the upper reaches of the River Somme in France.

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When Field-Marshal Earl Haig died in it was estimated that at least one million people watched the funeral procession pass through the streets of London.

Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig: War hero or butcher of the Somme? Many historians see the Somme as one of, if not the most, significant events of the war. The devastating casualties and deaths of the war left thousands without their loved ones, a whole generation was lost at the Somme.

Field Marshal Sir. Douglas Haig. Butcher or Hero? - The Student Room