My speech for oration

President, Friends and Fellow Citizens:

My speech for oration

President, Friends and Fellow Citizens: He who could address this My speech for oration without a quailing sensation, has stronger nerves than I have. I do not remember ever to have appeared as a speaker before any assembly more shrinkingly, nor with greater distrust of my ability, than I do this day.

A feeling has crept over me, quite unfavorable to the exercise of my limited powers of speech. The task before me is one which requires much previous thought and study for its proper performance.

I know that apologies of this sort are generally considered flat and unmeaning. I trust, however, that mine will not be so considered. Should I seem at ease, my appearance would much misrepresent me. The little experience I have had in addressing public meetings, in country schoolhouses, avails me nothing on the present occasion.

The papers and placards say, that I am to deliver a 4th [of] July oration. This certainly sounds large, and out of the common way, for it is true that I have often had the privilege to speak in this beautiful Hall, and to address many who now honor me with their presence.

But neither their familiar faces, nor the perfect gage I think I have of Corinthian Hall, seems to free me from embarrassment. The fact is, ladies and gentlemen, the distance between this platform and the slave plantation, from which I escaped, is considerable — and the difficulties to be overcome in getting from the latter to the former, are by no means slight.

That I am here to-day is, to me, a matter of astonishment as well as of gratitude. You will not, therefore, be surprised, if in what I have to say I evince no elaborate preparation, nor grace my speech with any high sounding exordium. With little experience and with less learning, I have been able to throw my thoughts hastily and imperfectly together; and trusting to your patient and generous indulgence, I will proceed to lay them before you.

Pericles' Funeral Oration - Wikipedia

This, for the purpose of this celebration, is the 4th of July. It is the birthday of your National Independence, and of your political freedom. This, to you, is what the Passover was to the emancipated people of God. It carries your minds back to the day, and to the act of your great deliverance; and to the signs, and to the wonders, associated with that act, and that day.

This celebration also marks the beginning of another year of your national life; and reminds you that the Republic of America is now 76 years old. I am glad, fellow-citizens, that your nation is so young.Pericles’ Funeral Oration (With Corresponding Questions) Pericles (around B.C.E.) "Funeral Oration" supposedly delivered in winter, (from Thucydides, History of the Peloponnesian War, Pericles Puts the Speech in Context "Most of my predecessors in this place have commended the man who originally made this speech part of.

My speech for oration

Synopsis. Antony has been allowed by Brutus and the other conspirators to make a funeral oration for Caesar on condition that he not blame them for Caesar's death; however, while Antony's speech outwardly begins by justifying the actions of Brutus and the assassins "I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him", Antony uses rhetoric and .

The oration decried the widespread prejudice against educating women in the arts and sciences, which had been grounded in the view that a life of managing a household would require no such learning. — richard gunderman, Scientific American, "Maria Agnesi, the Greatest Female Mathematician You’ve Never Heard Of," 16 May Delivered at the Unveiling of The Freedmen’s Monument in Lincoln Park, Washington, D.C.

My speech for oration

Friends and Fellow-citizens: I warmly congratulate you upon the highly interesting object which has caused you to assemble in such numbers and spirit as you have today. Ars Notoria: THE NOTORY ART OF SOLOMON, Shewing the CABALISTICAL KEY Of: Magical Operations The liberal Sciences, Divine Revelation, and The Art of Memory.

Winfrey continued her speech by calling out a press that is "under siege" and a climate where women are being empowered to speak up and say "me too" — .

Shakespeare Resource Center - Speech Analysis: Julius Caesar